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American Revolutionary War
Continental Regiments

Additional and Extra Regiments in the Continental Army

The Extra Continental regiments and Additional Continental regiments differ from each other and from all other Continental Army infantry regiments by the manner in which they formed.

List of Extra Continental Regiments  ●  List of Additional Continental Regiments

The 16 Additional Continental regiments were approved by Congress as a separate group on December 27, 1776, specifically in response to a request from Gen. George Washington for additional troops, and Congress expressly delegated their formation directly to Washington.

All Additional Continental regiments were organized in the spring and summer of 1777. In contrast to both the Extra and Additional regiments, all other infantry regiments of the army were organized and supported under the direct authority of individual state governments.

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Extra Continental Regiments

Certain permanent infantry units existed in the Continental Army throughout the war which were neither one of the 88 regiments of infantry of the line authorized by the Continental Congress on September 16, 1776, nor one of the 16 additional regiments which the Congress authorized on December 27, 1776 and which Washington raised early in 1777.

These Extra Continental regiments, which were authorized by Congress and organized in late 1775 to mid-1776, are distinct by having formed without any administrative connection to an individual state.

These infantry units have been designated the extra regiments and corps of the Continental Army. The Extra Continental regiments, which are commonly confused with the Additional regiments, are:

1st Canadian Regiment

The 1st Canadian Regiment, an Extra Continental regiment, was raised by James Livingston to support Colonial efforts in the American Revolutionary War during the invasion of Quebec. Livingston recruited men from Chambly, Quebec as early as September 1775

Authorized on November 19, 1775 in the Continental Army as the Canadian Regiment and assigned to the New York Department; concurrently organized at Pointe Oliver, Canada, to consist of 8 companies.

Reassigned on January 8, 1776 from the New York Department and assigned to the Canadian Department. Re-designated on January 20, 1776 as the 1st Canadian Regiment.

Relieved on July 2, 1776 from the Canadian Department and assigned to the Northern Department.

Re-organized on December 18, 1776 to consist of 8 companies from Canada and New York.

It was assigned to the on December 28, 1777 to the 1st Massachusetts Brigade, an element of the Northern Department.

Reassigned on April 4, 1778 from the 1st Massachusetts Brigade and assigned to the Highland's Department.

Reassigned on July 22, 1778 from the Highland's Department and assigned to the Rhode Island Brigade, an element of the Eastern Department.

Re-organized in June 1779 to consist of 5 companies.

Reassigned on November 17, 1779 from the Rhode Island Brigade and assigned to Stark's Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army.

Reassigned on December 17, 1779 from the Stark's Brigade and assigned to Hand's Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army.

Reassigned on July 31, 1780 from Hand's Brigade. It was assigned to the on August 1, 1780 to the New Jersey Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army.

Relieved on August 4, 1780 from the New Jersey Brigade and assigned to the Highland's Department. Disbanded on January 1, 1781 at King's Ferry, New York

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the
Invasion of Quebec (1775), New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77), Northern Theater (1778–1782) and the Saratoga Campaign (1777). It took part in the following major battles:

2nd Canadian Regiment

(aka Congress' Own or Hazen's Regiment)
The 2nd Canadian Regiment was authorized on January 20, 1776, in the Continental Army as the 2d Canadian Regiment and assigned to the Canadian Department. The Regiment was raised as an Extra Continental regiment in the province of Quebec for service with the Continental Army under the command of Colonel Moses Hazen.

Organized on February 10, 1776 at Montreal, Canada to consist of 4 battalions (20 companies) from Richelieu and St. Lawrence Valleys.

Reassigned on July 2, 1776 from the Canadian Department and assigned to the Northern Department.

Reassigned on November 12, 1776 from the Northern Department and assigned to the Highland's Department.

Re-organized on January 1, 1777 to consist of to consist of 4 battalions (20 companies) recruited at large.

Reassigned on January 8, 1777 from the Highland's Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.

Assigned on May 22, 1777 to the 2d Maryland Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army.

Reassigned on January 28, 1778 from the 2d Maryland Brigade and assigned to the Northern Department.

Reassigned on April 4, 1778 from the Northern Department and assigned Highland's Department.

Reassigned on July 22, 1778 from the Highland's Department and assigned to the New Hampshire Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army.

Reassigned on March 6, 1779 from the New Hampshire Brigade and assigned to the Northern Department.

Reassigned on August 1779 from the Northern Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.

Assigned on November 25, 1779 to Hand's Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army.

Reassigned on August 1, 1780 from Hand's Brigade and assigned to the New Hampshire Brigade, and element of the Main Continental Army.

Re-organized and redesignated on January 1, 1781 as the Canadian Regiment; concurrently relieved from the New Hampshire Brigade and assigned to the Highland's Department.

Reassigned on June 5, 1781 from the Highland's Department and assigned to the Northern Department.

Reassigned on August 10, 1781 from the Northern Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.

Assigned on September 24, 1781 to Hazen's Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army.

Reassigned on December 6, 1781 from Hazen's Brigade and assigned to the Middle Department.

Reassigned on June 9, 1783 from the Middle Department and assigned to the Highland's Department.

Re-organized on June 30, 1783 to consist of 2 companies. Disbanded on November 15, 1783 at West Point, New York.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78 and the Yorktown Campaign (1781). It took part in the following major battles:

German Battalion

Authorized on May 25, 1776 as an Extra Continental regiment, the unit recruited ethnic Germans from Maryland and Pennsylvania.

The Continental Congress appointed Nicholas Haussegger to command the battalion. which initially organized in the strength of eight companies. While the unit assembled at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, a ninth company was added. The regiment consisted of 5 companies from eastern Pennsylvania, 2 companies from Baltimore County, Maryland, and 2 companies from Fredrick County, Maryland.

It was assigned to the on June 26, 1776 to the Middle Department. The battalion fought at Trenton in December 1776, where its soldiers called out in German for the Hessians to lay down their arms.

Reassigned on September 23, 1776 from the Middle Department and assigned to the main Continental Army.

It was assigned to the on May 22, 1777 to the 2nd Maryland Brigade, an element of the main Continental Army.

Reassigned on May 24, 1777 from the 2nd Maryland Brigade and assigned to the 1st Virginia Brigade, an element of the main Continental Army.

Reassigned on July 22, 1778 from the 1st Virginia Brigade and assigned to the 2d Maryland Brigade, an element of the main Continental Army.

Reassigned on November 24, 1778 from the 2nd Maryland Brigade and assigned to the Hand's Brigade, an element of the main Continental Army.

Reassigned on October 8, 1779 from the Hand's Brigade and it was assigned to the on September 16, 1780 to the New Jersey Brigade, an element of the main Continental Army.

Disbanded on January 1, 1781 at Morristown, New Jersey, and Baltimore, Maryland.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77), Northern Theater (1778–1782) and the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78. It took part in the following major battles:

Maryland and Virginia Rifle Regiment

  • Authorized on June 14, 1775 in the Continental Army as two Maryland and one Virginia Independent Rifle Companies and assigned to the main Continental Army.
  • Capts. Michael Cresap's and Thomas Price's Companies organized on June 21, 1775 by the Frederick County, Maryland, Committee of Safety. (Capt. Cresap's died on October 18, 1775 and Lt. Moses Rawlings promoted to command and Price promoted on January 14, 1776 and Lt. Otho Holland Williams promoted to command)
  • Capt. Hugh Stephenson's Company organized on June 22, 1775 by the Berkley County, Virginia, Committee of Safety
  • Maryland and Virginia Rifle Regiment authorized on June 17, 1776 in the Continental Army and assigned to the Main Army.
  • The regiment was organized on June 17, 1776 to consist of 3 existing companies and 2 new companies to be raised in Maryland and 4 new companies to be raised in Virginia. Capts. Stephens, Rawlings and Williams promoted, respectively, to be Colonel, Lieutenant-Colonel, and Major
  • New companies organized between July 11-31, 1776 in Frederick and Harford Counties, Maryland and Fauquier, Berkley, Frederick and Culpepper Counties Virginia.
  • Captured in part on November 16 at Fort Washington, New York, by the British Army and regimental organization disbanded.
  • Virginia portion transferred on February 3, 1777 to the 11th Virginia Regiment.
  • Maryland portion provisionally re-organized in November 1776 as a single company under Captain Alexander Lawson Smith and attached to the 4th Maryland Regiment.
  • Re-organized on March 21, 1779 as Rawlings' Independent Corps, to consist of 3 companies; concurrently relived from the Main Army and assigned to the Western Department.
  • Disbanded on January 1, 1781 at Fort Pitt, Pennsylvania.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77), Northern Theater (1778–1782) and the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78. It took part in the following major battles:

Detached elements participated

Warner's Regiment

(aka Green Mountain Boys)

  • Authorized on June 23, 1775 in the Continental Army as the Green Mountain Boys and assigned to the New York (subsequently Northern) Department.
  • The regiment was organized on July 27, 1775 to consist of 7 companies from the New Hampshire Grants (portions of Albany and Charlotte Counties, New York, later becoming Vermont)
  • Re-organized in part on January 1, 1776 as Maj. Brown's Detachment at Quebec, to consist of 6 companies.
  • Expanded on February 12, 1776 as Warner's Regiment, an element of the Canadian Department.
  • Reauthorized on July 5, 1776 in the Continental Army as Warner's Regiment and assigned to the Northern Department.
  • Re-organized on July 16, 1776 to consist of 6 companies.
  • Disbanded on January 1, 1781 at West Point New York.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the Invasion of Quebec (1775) and the Saratoga Campaign (1777). It took part in the following major battles:

DuBois' Regiment

(later, the 5th New York Regiment)
Dubois's Regiment of 1776, commanded by Col. Lewis Dubois, who recruits men from his home area, around Poughkeepsie.

Authorized on June 21, 1776 in the Continental Army as "Dubois' Regiment." The regiment was assigned to the Northern Department.

Partially organized in the fall of 1776 in Albany. The regiment was made up primarily from veterans who served in Canada during operations in 1775-76.

Reorganized and re designated January 26, 1777 as the 5th New York Regiment.

Elmore's Regiment

Commander-in-Chief's Guard

(Washington's Life Guard)
The Commander-in-Chief's Guard, commonly known as Washington's Life Guard, was a unit of the Continental Army that protected General George Washington during the American Revolutionary War. Formed in 1776, the Guard was with Washington in all of his battles. It was disbanded in 1783 at the end of the war.

Long's Regiment

Long's Regiment was raised on May 14, 1776 at New Castle, New Hampshire under Colonel Pierse Long for service with the Continental Army.

The regiment was stationed at Fort Ticonderoga and Mount Independence on Lake Champlain and fought a delaying action at Fort Ann, New York on July 8, 1777 against the advance units of John Burgoyne's army.

The regiment was disbanded at the end of July, 1777 in northern New York as the one year enlistments of the men ran out before the main engagements of the Saratoga Campaign.

Col. Long and some of the men of the regiment joined other New Hampshire regiments that fought at Saratoga.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the Saratoga Campaign (1777). It took part in the following major battles:

Ward's Regiment

Ward's Regiment, or 1st Massachusetts Regiment, was raised April 23, 1775, as a Massachusetts militia regiment at Cambridge, Massachusetts, under Colonel Jonathan Ward. The regiment would join the Continental Army in June 1775.

Designated the 21st Continental Regiment in 1776. The regiment was disbanded on January 1, 1777, at Morristown, New Jersey.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the
Siege of Boston (1775–1776) and the New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77). It took part in the following major battles:

Westmoreland Independent Companies

(Wyoming)

COMING SOON!

New Hampshire Rangers

(Whitcomb's Rangers)

COMING SOON!

Additional Continental Regiments

The 16 Additional Continental regiments formed later and under distinctly different circumstances than those of the Extra Continental regiments.

The 1-year enlistments in most Continental Army regiments that formed in the earliest part of the American Revolutionary War expired on December 31, 1776. Therefore, Congress and Washington began preparations for reorganizing the army during that early fall.

The reorganization was to apply to troops from every state, and a major factor in the new plan was the decision to recruit for the duration of the war rather than for a single year.

Eighty-eight regiments were authorized by a Congressional resolve of September 16, 1776, in which Congress formally outlined the 13 state lines of the Continental Army by specifying the quota of regiments for each state.

Congress' estimates of the population of each state governed its allocation of regiments, ranging from 15 regiments each from Massachusetts and Virginia to single regiments from Delaware and Georgia. In correspondence to Congress during December 1776, however, Washington pressed for even more men.

Central to Washington's position was a recommendation to increase the infantry regiments from the 88 called for in September to a minimum of 110.

In contrast to the previously approved 88 regiments, the 16 Additional regiments were organized directly by Washington's authority, rather than by the authority of the state governments, and were placed completely under Washington's control.

The resolution gave Washington the requested 110 regiments, for in addition to the 16 new regiments and the 88 units of the September quotas there were the 6 Extra regiments that had been previously approved by Congress and that were also not explicitly tied to a single state.

Units designated "Additional Continental Regiments" were unnumbered infantry regiments authorized in 1777. These units were raised "at large" and not part of any state's quota, although some were later adopted into state lines. Sixteen regiments were authorized, but because of manpower shortages Washington attempted to raise only 15.

Two of these 15 (Cornell's and Scammell's Regiments) were never organized because their colonels declined the position in favor of other commands, leaving 13 "additional" regiments. Although Washington wrote to Col. Ezekiel Cornell of Rhode Island and Col. Alexander Scammell of New Hampshire on January 12, 1777, and offered each command of one of the 16 Additional Continental regiments, both declined, and the units never raised.

Congress subsequently authorized one more "additional" regiment, Sheppard's Additional Continental Regiment, but it was absorbed into the weak North Carolina line within a year. The 16 Additional Continental regiments are:


Formans Additional Continental Regiment

  • Authorized on January 11, 1777 in the Continental Army as Forman's Additional Regiment and assigned to the main Continental Army.
  • The regiment was organized in spring of 1777 at Monmouth, New Jersey, to consist of 4 companies from southern New Jersey and Maryland.
  • Consolidated on April 1, 1779 with Spencer's Additional Continental Regiment.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78. It took part in the following major battles:

Gist's Regiment

Authorized on January 11, 1777 (the unit was intended to be made up of four companies of light infantry and 500 Indian scouts) in the Continental Army as Gist's Additional Regiment and assigned to the Main Army.

Partially organized in spring and summer to consist of 3 companies from Virginia and Maryland and temporarily attached as follows: Capts. John Gist's and Joseph Lapsley's Companies to the 3rd Maryland Regiment; Capt. Samuel Lapsley's Company to the 11th Virginia Regiment.

Consolidated on April 22, 1779 with Grayson's Additional Continental Regiment And Thurston's Additional Continental Regiment and consolidated unit designated as Gist's Additional Continental Regiment, to consist of 8 companies.

It was assigned to the to the 1st Virginia Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army.

1st Virginia Brigade relieved on December 4, 1779 from the Main Continental Army and assigned to the Southern Department.

Captured on May 12, 1780 at Charlestown, South Carolina, by the British Army.

Disbanded on January 1, 1781

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the Northern Theater (1778–1782), Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78 and the Southern Theater 1775-82. It took part in the following major battles:

Grayson's Continental Regiment

Authorized 10 January 1777 in the Continental Army as Grayson's Additional Continental Regiment and assigned to the Main Continental Army.

Organized in spring 1777 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to consist of 9 companies from Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware.

Assigned on May 22, 1777 to the 4th Virgina Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army.

Reassigned on April 22, 1778 from the 4th Virgina Brigade and assigned to the 3rd Virgina Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army.

Consolidated on April 22, 1779 with Gist's Additional Continental Regiment.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78. It took part in the following major battles:

Hartley's Additional Continental Regiment

(11th Pennsylvania Regiment / New Eleventh Pennsylvania Regiment)

Authorized 12 January 1777 in the Continental Army as Hartley's Additional Continental Regiment and assigned to the Main Continental Army.

Organized in spring 1777 at Philadelphia to consist of eight companies from eastern Pennsylvania, eastern Maryland, and Delaware.

Assigned 22 May 1777 to the 1st Pennsylvania Brigade, an element of the Main Army.

Relieved 8 January 1778 from the 1st Pennsylvania Brigade and assigned to the Middle Department. Allotted 27 March 1778 to the Pennsylvania Line. (Captain William Scott's Company of Thruston's Additional Continental Regiment, consolidated 4 April 1778 with the regiment.)

Consolidated 13 January 1779 with Patton's Additional Continental Regiment and Captain John Doyle's, Captain John Steele's, and Captain James Calderwood's Companies of Malcolm's Additional Continental Regiment and consolidated unit redesignated as the 11th Pennsylvania Regiment, an element of the Middle Department, to consist of nine companies.

Relieved 9 April 1779 from the Middle Department and assigned to Hand's Brigade, an element of the Main Army.

Relieved 1 August 1780 from Hand's Brigade and assigned to the 2d Pennsylvania Brigade, an element of the Main Army.

Consolidated 17 January 1781 with the 3d Pennsylvania Regiment.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78. It took part in the following major battles:

Henley's Additional Continental Regiment

Authorized on January 12, 1777 in the Continental Army as Henley's Additional Continental Regiment.

Assigned on May 23, 1777 to the Eastern Department

Organized in spring and summer 1777 at Boston to consist of 5 companies from Middlesex, Essex, Suffolk, and Worcester Counties, Massachusetts and Hillsborough and Rockingham Counties, New Hampshire.

Reassigned on March 18, 1778 from the Eastern Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.

Reassigned on July 22, 1778 from the Main Army and assigned to the Eastern Department.

Consolidated on April 9, 1779 with Henry Jackson's Additional Continental Regiment.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77) and the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78. It took part in the following major battles:

Henry Jackson's Additional Continental Regiment

(aka 16th Massachusetts Regiment)

Authorized on January 12, 1777 in the Continental Army as Henry Jackson's Additional Continental Regiment. Organized in spring and summer 1777 at Boston to consist of 7 companies from Middlesex and Suffolk Counties. Assigned on May 23, 1777 to the Eastern Department.

Reassigned on October 7, 1777 from the Eastern Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army. Reassigned on July 22, 1778 from the Main Continental Army and assigned to the Eastern Department.

Consolidated on April 9, 1779 with Lee's Additional Continental Regiment and Henley's Additional Continental Regiment and consolidated unit designated as Henry Jackson's Continental Regiment, to consist of 9 companies; concurrently, assigned to the 2nd Massachusetts Brigade, an element of the Eastern Department.

Reassigned on July 7, 1779 from the 2nd Massachusetts Brigade. It was assigned to the on September 28, 1779 to the Rhode Island Brigade, an element of the Eastern Department.

Reassigned on November 17, 1779 from the Rhode Island Brigade and assigned to Stark's Brigade, an element of the Main Army

Re-designated on July 24, 1780 as the 16th Massachusetts Regiment. Disbanded on January 1, 1781 at New Windsor, New York.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77) and the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78. It took part in the following major battles:

Lee's Additional Continental Regiment

Authorized on January 12, 1777 in the Continental Army as Lee's Additional Continental Regiment. Organized in spring and summer 1777 at Cambridge to consist of 6 companies from Middlesex County, Essex County, Suffolk County, and Bristol County in Massachusetts. Assigned on May 23, 1777 to the Eastern Department.

Reassigned on October 2, 1777 from the Eastern Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.

Reassigned on July 22, 1778 from the Main Continental Army and assigned to the Eastern Department.

Consolidated on April 9, 1779 with Henry Jackson's Additional Continental Regiment.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77) and the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78. It took part in the following major battles:

Malcolm's Additional Continental Regiment

Authorized 7 January 1777 in the Continental Army as Malcolm's Additional Continental Regiment. Assigned 27 June 1777 to the Highlands Department and organized at Ramapo, New Jersey, to consist of six companies from southern New York.

Relieved 23 September 1777 from the Highlands Department and assigned to the Main Army.

Assigned 11 October 1777 to the 3d Pennsylvania Brigade, an element of the Main Army.

Reorganized 13 October 1777 to consist of ten companies by consolidation with Captains John Steele's, Matthew Irvine's, Samuel Kearsley's and James Calderwood's Companies (organized in spring 1777 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as elements of the Main Army with personnel from central Pennsylvania).

Reorganized 3 December 1777 to consist of eight companies. Relieved 19 July 1778 from the 3d Pennsylvania Brigade and assigned to the Highlands Department.

Regiment broken up and elements consolidated as follows:

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77), Saratoga Campaign (1777) and the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78.

Patton's Additional Continental Regiment

(aka 5th New Jersey Regiment)

Patton's Additional Continental Regiment was authorized on 11 January 1777 for service with the Continental Army and assigned to the Main Continental Army

ohn Patton was appointed colonel of the regiment. Patton had distinguished himself in command of one battalion of the Pennsylvania State Rifle Regiment during the New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77).

George Washington allowed the colonels of his Additional Regiments considerable authority to select their officers. Assistant Quartermaster General John Parke was named lieutenant colonel while Brigade Major Peter Scull accepted the position of major.

Patton's Additional Continental Regiment was organized in the spring of 1777 of men from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware. The unit had a strength of seven companies.

On 22 May the regiment was assigned to the 4th Virginia Brigade, which was commanded by Charles Scott. It took part in the June 1777 campaign in Northern New Jersey and the Philadelphia Campaign in late 1777.

Patton's Regiment transferred from the 4th Virginia Brigade to the Highlands Department on 22 July 1778.

The regiment ceased to exist on 13 January 1779 when it consolidated with Hartley's Additional Continental Regiment. The exception was Captain Allen McLane's Delaware company which separated from Patton's Regiment on 16 December 1778 and joined the 1st Delaware Regiment in the 3rd Virginia Brigade.

On 13 July 1779, McLane's company transferred to Lee's Legion as the 4th Dismounted Troop.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78. It took part in the following major battles:

Sheppard's Additional Continental Regiment

(aka 10th North Carolina Regiment)

The Regiment was authorized on April 17, 1777 in the North Carolina State Troops as Sheppard's Regiment.

Organized on April 19 to July 1, 1777 at Kinston to consist of eight companies from Northeastern part of North Carolina.

Adopted on June 17, 1777 into the Continental Army as Sheppard's Additional Continental Regiment and assigned to the Main Army.

Disbanded on June 1, 1778 at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78. The regiment did not see any action.

Further Reading

Sherburne's Additional Continental Regiment

Authorized 12 January 1777 in the Continental Army as Sherburne's Additional Continental Regiment. Organized in spring 1777 at Fishkill, New York, to consist of three companies from Rhode Island and three companies from eastern Connecticut. Assigned 12 June 1777 to the 1st Connecticut Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department.

Relieved 21 June 1777 from the 1st Connecticut Brigade and assigned to the Rhode Island Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department.

Relieved 14 September 1777 from the Rhode Island Brigade and assigned to the 1st Connecticut Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department.

Relieved 21 July 1778 from the 1st Connecticut Brigade and assigned to the Rhode Island Brigade, an element of the Eastern Department.

Relieved 17 November 1779 from the Rhode Island Brigade and assigned to Stark's Brigade, an element of the Main Army.

Disbanded 1 May 1780 at Morristown, New Jersey when it was consolidated with the 1st and 2nd Rhode Island regiments to form the Rhode Island Regiment.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77) and the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78. It took part in the following major battles:

Spencer's Additional Continental Regiment

(aka 5th New Jersey Regiment)

The Continental Congress authorized the Regiment on 11 January 1777 in the Continental Army as Spencer's Additional Continental Regiment and assigned to the Main Army. Organized in spring 1777 at Monmouth Court House, New Jersey, to consist of seven companies from New Jersey and one company from Pennsylvania, Commanded by Colonel Oliver Spencer.

Assigned 22 May 1777 to the 3d Pennsylvania Brigade, an element of the Main Army.

Relieved 19 July 1778 from the 3d Pennsylvania Brigade and assigned to the Highlands Department. Relieved 16 November 1778 from the Highlands Department and assigned to the Middle Department.

Consolidated 1 April 1779 with Forman's Additional Continental Regiment and part of Malcolm's Additional Continental Regiment and consolidated unit designated as Spencer's Additional Continental Regiment, an element of the Middle Department, to consist of nine companies.

Relieved 26 June 1779 from the Middle Department and assigned to the New Jersey Brigade, an element of the Main Army.

Relieved 16 September 1780 from the New Jersey Brigade and assigned to the Highland's Department. Disbanded 1 January 1781 at King's Ferry, New York.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the Northern Theater (1778–1782) and the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78. It took part in the following major battles:

Thruston's Additional Continental Regiment

Authorized 15 March 1777 in the Continental Army as Thruston's Additional Continental Regiment, an element of the Main Army.

Partially organized in spring and summer 1777 in Virginia to consist of four companies. George Washington appointed influential Shenandoah Valley political leader Charles Mynn Thruston as colonel in command.

Captain William Scott's Company consolidated 4 April 1778 with Hartley's Additional Continental Regiment. Remnants attached 15 November 1778 to Grayson's Additional Continental Regiment, an element of the 3d Virginia Brigade of the Main Army.

Consolidated 22 April 1779 with Gist's Additional Continental Regiment.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78. It took part in the following major battles:

S. B. Webb's Additional Continental Regiment

(aka 9th Connecticut Regiment and the Decoy Regiment)

Authorized on January 11, 1777 in the Continental Army as the S. B. Webb's Additional Continental Regiment.

The regiment was organized in the spring of 1777 at Wethersfield, Connecticut, to consist of 8 companies from New London, New Haven, and Hartford Counties.

It was assigned to the on April 14, 1777 to the Highland's Department.

It was assigned to the on June 12 to McDougall's Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department.

Reassigned on July 10, 1777 from McDougall's Brigade and assigned to the Rhode Island Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department.

Reassigned on September 12, 1777 from the Rhode Island Brigade and assigned to the 1st Connecticut Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department.

Reassigned on July 22, 1778 from the 1st Connecticut Brigade and assigned to the Rhode Island Brigade, an element of the Eastern Department.

Reassigned on November 17, 1779 from the Eastern Department and assigned to the Stark's Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army.

Re-organized on April 9, 1780 to consist of 9 companies.

Adopted on July 24, 1780 by Connecticut and redesignated as the 9th Connecticut Regiment.

Stark's Brigade relieved on October 7, 1780 from the Main Continental Army and assigned to the Highland's Department.

2nd Connecticut Brigade relieved on November 16, 1779 from the Highland's Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.

2nd Connecticut Brigade relieved on November 27, 1780 from the Main Continental Army and assigned to the Highland's Department.

Merged on January 1, 1781 with the 2nd Connecticut Regiment.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77) and the Northern Theater (1778–1782). It took part in the following major battles: