American Revolutionary War
Continental Regiments

Connecticut Regiments in the Continental Army

The Connecticut Line was a formation within the Continental Army. The term "Connecticut Line" referred to the quota of numbered infantry regiments assigned to Connecticut at various times by the Continental Congress, the size of its allocation determined by the size of its population in relative to that of other states.

In the course of the war, 27 infantry regiments were assigned to the Connecticut Line.

This included the eight provincial regiments of 1775, Wooster's Provisional Regiment (formed by consolidation of the remnants of the original 1st, 4th, and 5th Regiments), the five numbered Continental regiments of 1776, the eight Connecticut regiments of 1777,  Webb's Additional Continental Regiment, which later became the 9th Connecticut Regiment, and four new regiments created by consolidation in 1781.

On 21 April representatives from Massachusetts met with the Connecticut Committee of Correspondence in the home of Governor Jonathan Trumbull at Lebanon. Trumbull sent his son David to inform Massachusetts that a special session of the Connecticut assembly would meet as soon as possible.

While some Connecticut militia units marched to Boston on hearing of Lexington, most followed the advice of the governor to wait until the assembly could act. The wisdom of this course was confirmed by news that although Israel Putnam had asserted a loose hegemony over the volunteers, a formal command structure was needed before they would become effective.

The special session convened at Hartford on 26 April, and the next day the Connecticut Assembly ordered that six regiments be raised, each containing ten companies. Officers were appointed on 28 April and arranged on 1 May.

At the time the assembly believed that these 6,000 men represented 25 percent of the colony's militia strength; they were obligated to serve until 10 December.

The companies were apportioned among the several counties according to population. Connecticut's regimental structure followed a somewhat older model than that chosen by the other colonies and was considerably larger.

Connecticut placed generals in direct command of regiments, as Massachusetts did, but followed Rhode Island's example in having field officers command companies. This left generals filling three roles at the same time-that of general, colonel, and captain. Rather than assigning an extra lieutenant to each field officer's company, as Rhode Island did, Connecticut merely designated the senior lieutenant in each colonel's company as a captain-lieutenant.

On the other hand, the Connecticut organization called for each company to contain four officers rather than the three the other New England jurisdictions provided. The assembly appointed Joseph Spencer and Israel Putnam brigadier generals and David Wooster major general. It assigned supply responsibilities to Joseph Trumbull, another of the governor's sons, by appointing him commissary general.

After a recess the assembly reconvened on 11 May and remained in session for the rest of the month, passing legislation that resolved a number of logistical, administrative, and disciplinary problems. It defined the regimental adjutant as a distinct officer.

It also appointed Samuel Mott as the colony's engineer, with the rank of lieutenant colonel, and ordered him to Fort Ticonderoga.

This session created a Committee of Safety, also known as the Committee of Defense or the Committee of War, which served for the rest of the war as the governor's executive and advisory body. The assembly considered, but rejected, reorganizing the six regiments into eight to bring the size of these units more into conformity with that of the regiments from the other colonies.

Another special session (1-6 July) added two more regiments, but these were smaller than the earlier ones. The assembly reduced the number of privates in these regiments by nearly a third, while retaining their same organization and superstructure, and then ordered both to Boston.

Deployment of the Connecticut regiments followed a pattern established during the colonial period. In the Imperial Wars the colony had been responsible for reinforcing its neighbors, supporting New York on the northern frontier around Albany and assuming primary responsibility for the defense of western Massachusetts.

In 1775 Spencer's 2d and Putnam's 3d Connecticut Regiments, raised in the northeastern and north-central portions of the colony, naturally marched to Boston. Samuel Parsons' 6th, from the southeast, followed as soon as the vital port of New London was secure. Benjamin Hinman's 4th, from Litchfield County in the northwest, went to Fort Ticonderoga, where the county's men had served in earlier wars.

The 1st regiment under Wooster and the 5th Regiment under David Waterbury, from Fairfield and New Haven Counties, respectively, in the southwest, prepared to secure New York City.

News of the battle of Bunker Hill led Governor Trumbull to place the men in Massachusetts temporarily under the command of General Ward. At the same time the 1st and 5th regiments were ordered into New York, subject to the orders of the Continental Congress and the New York Provincial Congress.

Search Connecticut Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783 from The National Archives: These documents include muster rolls, payrolls, strength returns, and other miscellaneous personnel, pay, and supply records of American Army units, 1775-83.

Search Compiled Service Records of Soldiers Who Served from Connecticut in the American Army During the Revolution from The National Archives: NARA M881. Compiled service records of soldiers who served in the American Army during the Revolutionary War, 1775-1783.

Search the Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files of Connecticut Veterans from The National Archives:: NARA M804. The records in this collection include entire pension files for soldiers and sailors who served in the Revolutionary War. Unlike selected service records, which were typically chosen subjectively for genealogical content, these records reveal more details about each veteran's history and service, as well as more information about his family, state of health, and life after the war.

1st Connecticut Regiment

1775

  • April 27,1775
    The 1st Connecticut Provincial Regiment was raised at Norwich, Connecticut in the Connecticut State Troops and was commanded by Major General David Wooster. The regiment consisted of 1000 men in ten companies of volunteers from New Haven and Litchfield counties.
  • June 14, 1775
    It was adopted into the Main Continental Army.
  • June 24, 1775
    the regiment was assigned to the New York (Northern) Department.
  • July 13, 1775
    two companies (Captain Bradford Steel's and Captain Caleb Trowbridge's) were detached and reassigned to the Main Continental Army and participated in the Siege of Boston. The two companies were disbanded on 20 December 1775 at Cambridge, Massachusetts.
  • December 1, 1775 to April 15, 1776
    The regiment was reassigned to the Canadian Department and was disbanded in Canada.
  • Engagements
    The regiment saw action in the Invasion of Canada and the Battle of Trois-Rivières.

1776–1780

1781–1783

  • January 1st, 1781 - The 1st Connecticut Regiment was organized from the merger of the 3rd Connecticut Regiment with the 4th Connecticut Regiment.
  • January 1st, 1783 - Was reassigned from the 1st Connecticut Brigade to the Connecticut Brigade in the Highland's Department.
  • June 15th, 1783 - The regiment was re designated the Connecticut Brigade and reassigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • January 1, 1783 - The regiment was disbanded at West Point, New York.

2d Connecticut Regiment

1775

The 2d Connecticut Provincial Regiment (1775) was commanded by Colonel Joseph Spencer. In August 1775, Spencer's Regiment was designated "The 33d Regiment of Foot."

1776-1783

The 2nd Connecticut Regiment was authorized in the Continental Army on 16 September 1776. It was organized between 1 January and April 1777 at Danbury, Connecticut of eight companies from the counties of Fairfield, Windham, and Hartford in Connecticut and assigned on 3 April 1777 to the 1st Connecticut Brigade of the Highland's Department.

The regiment was reassigned from 1st Connecticut Brigade and assigned to the McDougall's Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department on 12 June 1777; then three days later (15 June 1777 it was reassigned to the 2nd Connecticut Brigade. One month later, 10 July 1777 the regiment was reassigned to 1st Connecticut Brigade.

On November 13, 1777 the regiment was reassigned to the 2nd Connecticut Brigade of the Main Continental Army.

On 1 May 1779 the 2nd Connecticut Brigade was reassigned to the Highland's Department and the regiment was re-organized to nine companies on July 11, 1779.

The regiment was reassigned to the Main Continental Army on November 16, 1779. It was reassigned to the Highland's Department on November 27, 1780.

On 1 January 1781 the regiment was merged with 9th Connecticut Regiment, re-organized and re-designated as the 3rd Connecticut Regiment of the 1st Connecticut Brigade.

The regiment was furloughed 15 June 1783 at West Point, New York and disbanded on 15 November 1783.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the
New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77) and the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78.
It took part in the following major battles:

3d Connecticut Regiment

1775

The 3d Connecticut Provincial Regiment (1775) was commanded by Colonel Israel Putnam. In August 1775, Putnam's Regiment was designated "The 34th Regiment of Foot."

1777-1783

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77)

4th Connecticut Regiment

1775

The 4th Connecticut Provincial Regiment (1775) was commanded by Colonel Benjamin Hinman. Hinman's Regiment was assigned to the Separate, or New York, Department in 1775 and did not receive an additional designation in August.

1777 - 1781

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78.
It took part in the following major battles:

Unit History

The Regiment was authorized on April 27, 1775 in the Connecticut State Troops as the 4th Connecticut Regiment. Organized between May 1-20, 1775, to consist of 10 companies from Litchfield and Hartford Counties. Each company to consist of 1 captain or field grade officer, two lieutenants, one ensign, four sergeants, four corporals, one drummer. one fifer, and 100 privates.

Adopted on June 14, 1775 into the Continental Army

Took part in the Invasion of Canada, Battle of Quebec (Autumn and Winter 1775). Two companies from this regiment were garrisoned at Fort Ticonderoga.

Disbanded in December 1775 in Canada, less two companies disbanded 19-20 December 1775 at Cambridge, Massachusetts. These latter two were Lieutenant Colonel Ozias Bissell's and Captain Hezekiah Parsons' Companies, which stayed behind to serve at the Siege of Boston

COMMANDER: Col. Benjamin Hyman (Hinman) May 1- December 20, 1775.
The Regiment was authorized on September 16, 1776 in the Continental Army as the 4th Connecticut Regiment

Re- organized between January 1-April 1777 at Norwich to consist of 8 companies from New London, Windham, and Hartford Counties

Defense of Philadelphia Campaign (Fall and early Winter, 1777; included Battles of Brandywine, Germantown and Whitemarsh)

Winter Quarters at Valley Forge, 1777-78 as part of Varnum's Brigade. Col. Durkee commanding, Second in command was Lt. Col. Giles Russell

Battles of Philadelphia-Monmouth (June 28, 1778)

The all black 2nd Company of the 4th Connecticut Regiment, consisting of 48 black privates and NCOs, was formed in October 1780 and served until November 1782. on January 1, 1781, most of its personnel were moved to the new 1st Connecticut Regiment.

Of the force that took Redoubt #10 at Yorktown under command of Alexander Hamilton, some 20 men of the 4th Connecticut, commanded by a Lieutenant, John Mansfield, crashed though the abattis without waiting for the sappers to clear it. Some 70 British soldiers remained in the redoubt to contest the point. The battle took ten minutes.

COMMANDER: Col. John Durkee January 1, 1777- January 1,1781

Re-formed again January 1, 1781 by redesignating the old 6th Connecticut. Served until January 1, 1783 when it was broken up. Half its remaining enlisted men were incorporated into the 1st Connecticut Regiment; half into the 3rd Connecticut Regiment.

COMMANDER: Col. Zebulon Butler January 1, 1781-January 1, 1783.

5th Connecticut Regiment

1775

The 5th Connecticut Provincial Regiment (1775) was commanded by Colonel David Waterbury.

April 19, 1775 will long be remembered as the date that began the American War for Independence. on that date the British Army carried out a raid on Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts. With the news of the attack and the resulting battle, the Connecticut Assembly acted swiftly by authorizing the establishment of its part of a New England Army which had long been called for by the Massachusetts Provincial Congress.

Formed on May 1, 1775, the 5th Connecticut Regiment, commanded by Colonel David Waterbury, was one of the original six regiments of Connecticut's Colonies adopted this Army into the Continental Army. Waterbury's Regiment was assigned to the Separate, or New York, Department in 1775 and did not receive an additional designation in August. The Regiment then served at Fort Ticonderoga; participated in the successful siege of Fort Saint Johns, Canada; and helped capture Montreal in November. It was mustered out of service in December 1775.

1776 - 1783

The second formation, 5th Regiment-Connecticut Line, was part of the re-organized long term Continental Army, America's first regulars. It was formed in the spring of 1777 under Col. Philip Burr Bradley. The Regiment saw its first action against the British at Ridgefield, Connecticut in April 1777 and then was posted to the defense of the vital Highlands near West Point, New York. In October 1777, as reinforcements to Washington's main army, it fought at the Battle of Germantown, Pennsylvania. Suffering from lack of food, clothing and terrible sanitary conditions, the Regiment then spent the winter of 1777-78 at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.

Well prepared by Maj. Gen. Baron von Steuben, the Regiment fought gallantly at the Battle of Monmouth, New Jersey, in June of 1778. The unit served the next three years in the Highlands Defense. It encamped in Reading, Connecticut during the winter of 1778-79, and in retaliation for the British raids against the coastline of Connecticut in July 1779, the Continental Army counterattacked at Stony Point, New York. The Regiment contributed its Light Infantry Company to this assault. After the severe winter of 1779-80 near Morristown, New Jersey, the regiment passed 1780 uneventfully.

The Army was re-organized in 1781, and a new 5th Regiment-Connecticut Line was formed from the former 1st and 8th Regiments. In January, the regiment, now commanded by Col. Isaac Sherman, was sent into action in New York near Morisania. In 1781, the Regiment contributed 2 Light Infantry companies to operations in the south. Both companies fought at Yorktown where they participated in the last major infantry assault of the war-the famous capture of Redoubt Number 10. Sgt. William Brown of the 5th Regiment-Connecticut Line was awarded the Badge of Merit for his leadership that night. Known as the "Purple Heart," this was the earliest version of the Medal of Honor, and his was one of only three awarded during the Revolutionary War. The unit was mustered out for the last time in December, 1782 at West Point, New York.

  • Authorized on September 16, 1776 in the Continental Army as the 5th Connecticut Regiment.
  • The regiment was organized between January 1- April 1777 at Danbury to consist of 8 companies from Fairfield , Litchfield, and Hartford Counties.
  • It was assigned to the on April 3, 1777 to the 2nd Connecticut Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department.
  • Reassigned on June 12, 1777 from the 2nd Connecticut Brigade and assigned to the 1st Connecticut Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department.
  • 1st Connecticut Brigade relieved on June 15, 1777 from the Highland's Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • 1st Connecticut Brigade relieved on July 2, 1777 from the Main Continental Army and assigned to the Highland's Department.
  • Reassigned on July 10, 1777 from the 1st Connecticut Brigade and assigned to the 2nd Connecticut Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department.
  • Reassigned on September 12, 1777 from the 2nd Connecticut Brigade and assigned to the McDougall's Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department.
  • McDougall's Brigade relieved on September 14, 1777 form the Highland's Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • Reassigned on October 16, 1777 from McDougall's Brigade and assigned to the 2nd Connecticut Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army.
  • 2d Connecticut Brigade relieved on May 2, 1779 from the Main Continental Army and assigned to the Highland's Department.
  • Re-organized on July 11, 1779 to consist of 9 companies.
  • 2d Connecticut Brigade relieved on November 16, 1779 from the Highland's Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • 2d Connecticut Brigade relieved on November 27, 1780 from the Main Continental Army and assigned to the Highland's Department.
  • Merged on January 1, 1781 with the 7th Connecticut Regiment and re-organized and redesignated as the 2nd Connecticut Regiment, to consist of 9 companies, an element of the the 2nd Connecticut Brigade.
  • Reassigned on January 1, 1783 from the rwo Connecticut Brigade and assigned to the Connecticut Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department.
  • Furloughed on June 15, 1783 at West Point, New York
  • Disbanded on November 15, 1783

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the Siege of Boston (1775–1776), Invasion of Quebec (1775), New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77), Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78 and the Northern Theater (1778–1782).
It took part in the following major battles:

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6th Connecticut Regiment

1775

The 6th Connecticut Provincial Regiment (1775) was commanded by Colonel Samuel Holden Parsons. In August 1775, Parsons' Regiment was designated "The 13th Regiment of Foot."

1776 - 1783

In the year 1777, there was a re-organization of the Continental Army. Each colony was to provide a number of infantry regiments, the number being based on the population of the colony. Each colony was also to provide additional regiments of Dragoons and Artillery.

The Continental Regiments from each colony were to called a "LINE," for example, the Connecticut Line. Collectively the Lines were known as the Continental Line. Connecticut provided eight regiments plus many additional Regiments, such as, Webb's Additional Regiment.

Brig. Gen. ?? Parsons had the job of organizing the Connecticut Line. On April 14, 1777, he instructed the regiment as to where they were to be raised, the 6th Connecticut.

Regiment was raised at New Haven under Col. William Douglas and in Middletown under Col. Return Jonathan Meigs. Douglas was to expire from previous wounds and Col. Meigs then headed the Regiment.

On May 23, 1777, three weeks after the Battle of Ridgefield, Col. Meigs and 170 men from New Haven left Guilford, Connecticut in 13 whale boats and 2 armed sloops, not forgetting to take an extra sloop in which to bring back prisoners. This raid was planned as a reprisal for the British Brig. Gen. ?? Tyron's raid on Danbury whose action had cost the life of General David Wooster of New Haven.

Landing on Long Island they marched across to Sag Harbor, surprised the garrison, burned a dozen vessels, destroyed a large quantity of military stores, killed several of the enemy and took 90 prisoners. All of this, without losing a man. Imagine, if you will, rowing across the Sound, doing all of what they did and rowing back again, without losing a man. Incredible! For this action, Col. Meigs was voted a Sword by Congress. This sword now hangs in the Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.

After the Sag Harbor raid, the 6th Connectuct went to Peekskill, New York to join the other line regiment. The Connecticut Line wintered at West Point during the winter of 1777-1778. While there, they constructed "Meigs Redoubt" and other fortifications in the area.

In the summer of 1778, the Connecticut Line was encamped with the Army under General Washington at White Plains, New York near the battlefield of 1776. It was here that the Connecticut Line was divided into two brigades, which stood until January 1, 1781. The 6th Connecticut was placed in the 1st Brigade under Parsons. From White Plains, they took up winter quarters at Redding, Connecticut. The troops built huts and settled in. Maj. Gen. Isreal Putnam took command of all forces at Redding.

In the early part of 1779, the 6th Connecticut was encamped on the Highlands across from West Point. When Tryon raided Connecticut in July, the Connecticut Line was sent to defend it's own state, but arrived after Tryon and his men had left.

The Connecticut Line was then called on to provide a number of Light Infantry Companies to join with Brig. Gen. "Mad" Anthony Wayne. Being a Light Infantry Regiment, the 6th Connecticut filed the role perfectly and was sent, under Col. Meigs, to join with General Wayne.

on July 15, 1779 this force successfully stormed the British fort at Stony Point on the Hudson River.

From Stony Point, the 6th Connecticut was stationed with the Connecticut Line around West Point where it worked again on fortifications in the area. Maj. Gen. Baron Von Steuben praised the Connecticut Line for their proficiency on performing his manual of arms exercises.

The Morristown huts in New Jersey were the site of winter quarters for the two Connecticut Brigades in the winter of 1779-80. While the troops were in Morristown, the Connecticut troops protested their conditions and mutinied. Col. Meigs quelled this mutiny with reason and affection and with no loss of life. A letter from General Washington for this action commended him.

The Connecticut Line spent the summer of 1780 along the Hudson and while in Orangetown, New Jersey, heard of the treason of Connecticut's own Brig. Gen. Benedict Arnold and his flight on September 25. The Connecticut 6th Regiment was ordered to West Point to defend any attack the enemy might have planned. There was no attack and Connecticut Line went into winter quarters near West Point.

In 1781, the 6th Connecticut was consolidated with part of the 4th as the Continental forces wound down their forces pending the outcome of peace talks in Paris. Peace was to come some two years later in September 1783.

Timeline

  • Authorized on September 16, 1776 in the Continental Army as the 6th Connecticut Regiment.
  • The regiment was organized between January 1 - April 1777 at New Haven to consist of 8 companies from New Haven and New London Counties.
  • It was assigned to the on April 3, 1777 to the 1st Connecticut Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department.
  • 1st Connecticut Brigade relieved on June 15, 1777 from the Highland's Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • 1st Connecticut Brigade relieved on July 2, 1777 from the Main Continental Army and assigned to the Highland's Department.
  • 1st Connecticut Brigade relieved on July 21, 1778 from the Highland's Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • 1st Connecticut Brigade relieved on May 28, 1779 from the Main Continental Army and assigned to the Highland's Department.
  • Re-organized on July 11, 1779 to consist of 9 companies.
  • 1st Connecticut Brigade relieved on November 16, 1779 from the Highland's Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • Reassigned on September 25, 1780 from the 1st Connecticut Brigade and assigned to the Highland's Department
  • It was assigned to the on October 6, 1780 to the 1st Connecticut Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army.
  • 2d Connecticut Brigade relieved on November 16, 1779 from the Highland's Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • 1st Connecticut Brigade relieved on November 27, 1780 from the Main Continental Army and assigned to the Highland's Department.
  • Re-organized and redesignated on January 1, 1781 as the 4th Connecticut Regiment, to consist of 9 companies, concurrently relieved from the 1st Connecticut Brigade and assigned to the 2nd Connecticut Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department.
  • Disbanded on January 1, 1783 at West Point, New York

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the Siege of Boston (1775–1776) and the New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77).
It took part in the following major battles:

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7th Connecticut Regiment

1775

The 7th Connecticut Provincial Regiment (1775) was commanded by Colonel Charles Webb. In August 1775, Charles Webb's Regiment was designated "The 39th Regiment of Foot." It was renamed in 1776 to 19th Continental Regiment in 1776.

1776 - 1781

  • Authorized on September 16, 1776 in the Continental Army as the 7th Connecticut Regiment.
  • The regiment was organized between January 1- April 1777 at New Milford to consist of 8 companies from Litchfield, New Haven and New London Counties.
  • It was assigned to the on April 3, 1777 to the 2d Connecticut Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department.
  • Reassigned on June 15, 1777 from the 2d Connecticut Brigadeand assigned to the 1st Massachusetts Brigade, anHighland's Department.
  • Reassigned on July 10, 1777 from the 1st Massachusetts Brigade and assigned to the 2d Connecticut Brigade.
  • 2d Connecticut Brigade relieved on September 14, 1777 from the Highland's Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • 2d Connecticut Brigade relieved on May 1, 1779 from the Main Continental Army and assigned to the Highland's Department.
  • Re-organized on July 11, 1779 to consist of 9 companies.
  • 2d Connecticut Brigade relieved on November 16, 1779 from the Highland's Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • 2d Connecticut Brigade relieved on November 27, 1780 from the Main Continental Army and assigned to the Highland's Department.
  • Merged on January 1, 1781 with the 5th Connecticut Regiment.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78.
It took part in the following major battles:

8th Connecticut Regiment

1775

The 8th Connecticut Provincial Regiment (1775) was commanded by Colonel Jedediah Huntington. In August 1775, Huntington's Regiment was designated "The 29th Regiment of Foot."

1776 - 1781

  • Authorized on September 16, 1776 in the Continental Army as the 8th Connecticut Regiment.
  • The regiment was organized on January 1 - April 1777 at Danbury to consist of 8 companies from Fairfild, Litchfield, Hartford, New London, Windham and Hartford Counties.
  • It was assigned to the on April 3, 1777 to the 2nd Connecticut Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department.
  • Reassigned on June 15, 1777 from the 2nd Connecticut Brigade and assigned to the McDougall's Brigade, an element of the Highland's Department.
  • McDougall's Brigade relieved on September 14, 1777 from the Highland's Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • Reassigned on October 16, 1777 from McDougall's Brigade and assigned to the Rhode Island Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army.
  • Reassigned on July 21, 1778 from the Rhode Island and assigned to the 1st Connecticut Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army.
  • 1st Connecticut Brigade relieved on May 28, 1779 from the Main Continental Army and assigned to the Highland's Department.
  • Re-organized on July 11, 1779 to consist of 9 companies.
  • 1st Connecticut Brigade relieved on November 16, 1779 from the Highland's Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • 1st Connecticut Brigade relieved on November 27, 1780 from the Main Continental Army and assigned to the Highland's Department.
  • Merged on January 1, 1781 with the 1st Connecticut Regiment

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the Siege of Boston (1775–1776), New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77) and the Philadelphia Campaign 1777-78.
It took part in the following major battles:

9th Connecticut Regiment

The 9th Connecticut Regiment was first called Webb's Additional Continental Regiment (after its colonel, Samuel Blachley Webb) before being added to the Connecticut Line in 1780. It saw action at Setauket in 1777, Rhode Island in 1778, and Springfield, New Jersey, in 1780, and was generally active in the defense of Connecticut, southern New York, and northern New Jersey.

The regiment first saw action at the Battle of Setauket in August 1777 under Brigadier General Samuel Holden Parsons. It was then sent to the Hudson River Valley, where it served under General George Clinton in the aftermath of the October Battle of Forts Clinton and Montgomery.

In December 1777 the regiment was involved in a failed expedition to Long Island (a more elaborate attempt on Setauket than that of the previous August) in which Colonel Webb was captured. The regiment spent the winter of 1777-78 at West Point, where it assisted in the construction of fortifications (including the Webb redoubt, probably named for the colonel).

In 1778 the regiment was attached to the brigade of General James Varnum. As part of a combined Franco-American attempt to retake British-occupied Newport, Rhode Island, the brigade marched to Rhode Island, where it was involved in the August 29 Battle of Rhode Island. The battle was tactically indecisive, but the regiment was noted for its performance. The regiment wintered in Rhode Island.

The regiment spent most of 1779 in Rhode Island, but was sent to winter quarters at Morristown, New Jersey.

In the spring of 1780, the remnants of Sherburne's Additional Continental Regiment were merged into the unit, and it was formally added to the Connecticut Line as the 9th Connecticut Regiment. That June, the regiment was involved in the Battle of Springfield, in which a British attempt to penetrated from New York City to the Continental Army camp at Morristown was repulsed. Its winter quarters for 1780-81 were in the Hudson valley.

The regiment was merged into the 2nd Connecticut Regiment on January 1, 1781, at West Point, New York, which was disbanded at the end of the war on November 15, 1783. Colonel Webb, who was exchanged in 1781, was then given command of the reorganized 3rd Connecticut Regiment.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

The regiment would see action during the New York and New Jersey Campaign (1776-77), Northern Theater (1778–1782).
It took part in the following major battles:

Continental Regiments from Connecticut in 1776

On November 4, 1775, the Continental Congress resolved that on January 1, 1776, the Continental Army, exclusive of artillery and extra regiments, should consist of 27 infantry regiments. The troops were to be enlisted to serve until December 31, 1776.

The quota of regiments assigned to the states was 1 from Pennsylvania, 3 from New Hampshire, 16 from Massachusetts, 2 from Rhode Island, and 5 from Connecticut. Each regiment was to have an official establishment of 728 officers and men in eight companies.

The regiments were to receive numbers instead of names. For the campaign of 1776 Connecticut was to provide the 10th, 17th, 19th, 20th, and 22d Continental Regiments.

  • The 10th Continental Regiment was commanded by Colonel Samuel Holden Parsons from 1 January to 9 August 1776. Parsons became a brigadier general in the Continental Army on the latter date. John Tyler, who had been the lieutenant colonel of the regiment since 1 January 1776, served as its colonel from 10 August to 31 December 1776.
  • The 17th Continental Regiment was commanded by Colonel Jedediah Huntington from 1 January to 31 December 1776.
  • The 19th Continental Regiment was commanded by Colonel Charles Webb from 1 January to 31 December 1776. Nathan Hale, who was captured by the British and hanged as a spy on 22 September 1776, was one of the captains in this regiment.
  • The 20th Continental Regiment was commanded by John Durkee, with the rank of lieutenant colonel from 1 January to 12 August 1776 and with the rank of colonel from 12 August to 31 December 1776. Benedict Arnold had been appointed the colonel of this regiment as of 1 January 1776, but on that date he was serving in Quebec and, on 10 January 1776 he was made a brigadier general in the Continental Army.
  • The 22nd Continental Regiment was commanded by Colonel Samuel Wyllys from 1 January to 31 December 1776.

Elmore's Regiment

(aka 10th Connecticut Regiment)

Authorized 8 January 1776 in the Continental Army as a regiment to be raised from the troops in service in Canada and assigned to the Canadian Department.

Organized 15 April 1776 at Quebec, Canada, as Elmore's Regiment, to consist of eight companies, primarily from Connecticut. Reassigned 2 July 1776 from the Canadian Department and assigned to the Northern Department.

Colonel Samuel Elmore's Regiment was raised under authority of the Continental Congress, to serve for one year from April, 1776, and credited to Connecticut.

The Colonel, Samuel Elmore, had served as Major of Hinman's Regt. in the Northern Dept. in 1775, and again as Lieut.-Col. of Wooster's provisional Regt. in the winter of '75-'76.

Elmore and most of his company officers recruited their men in Connecticut and to some extent from the regiments that served in the North.

Some of the officers belonged in New York and a few in Massachusetts, and men were recruited from both of those states.

The regiment took the field in July, '76, under Schuyler, and on August 25th marched from Albany "into Tryon County." During the remainder of its term, it was posted at Ft. Stanwix and vincity.

Disbanded in May 1777 at Fort Schuyler, New York.

Burrall's Regiment

Authorized 8 January 1776 in the Continental Army as a regiment to be raised in Connecticut and assigned to the Canadian Department. Organized 18 January 1776 as Burrall's Regiment, to consist of eight companies.

Relieved 2 July 1776 from the Canadian Department and assigned to the Northern Department. Assigned 20 July 1776 to Arnold's Brigade, an element of the Northern Department. (Arnold's Brigade re-designated 26 October 1776 as Poor's Brigade.)

Relieved 18 November 1776 from Poor's Brigade.

Disbanded 19 January 1777 at Fort Ticonderoga, New York.

Ward's Regiment

Colonel Andrew Ward's regiment was raised in Connecticut, on requisition of the Continental Congress, to serve for one year from May 14, 1776, and stood on the same footing as the other Continental regiments of 1776.

Authorized 14 May 1776 in the Continental Army as a regiment to be raised in Connecticut and assigned to the Eastern Department. Organized in summer 1776 as Ward's Regiment, to consist of eight companies from Hartford, Windham, and New Haven Counties.

Relieved 1 August 1776 from the Eastern Department and assigned to the Main Army. Assigned 18 September 1776 to Sargent's Brigade, an element of the Main Army. Disbanded 14 May 1777 at Morristown, New Jersey.

Westmoreland's Independent Companies

(Wyoming Independent Companies)

Authorized 23 August 1776 in the Continental Army as the 1st and 2d Independent Westmoreland Companies.
Organized 26 August-21 September 1776 in Westmoreland County, Connecticut, Captains Robert Durkee and Samuel Ransom commanding, and assigned to the Middle Department.

Relieved 12 December 1776 from the Middle Department and assigned to the Main Army.

Relieved 15 June 1778 from the Main Army and assigned to the Western Department. Consolidated 23 June 1778 and consolidated unit redesignated as the WyomingIndependent Company, Captain Simon Spaulding commanding.

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Disbanded 1 January 1781 at Fort Wyoming, Connecticut.
Engagements
Northern New Jersey
Defense of Philadelphia
Philadelphia-Monmouth
Iroquois 1778
Iroquois 1779

Misc Militia Units

  • 1st Company Governor's Foot Guard, 1771
  • 2nd Company Governor's Foot Guard, 1775
  • 1st Company Governor's Horse Guards,1778
  • 2nd Connecticut Light Horse, 1777
  • 5th Connecticut Light Horse, 1776–79
  • Backus' Regiment of Light Horse, 1776
  • Skinner's Regiment of Light Horse, 1776
  • Starr's Regiment of Light Horse, 1779
  • Seymour's Regiment of Light Dragoons
  • 1st Battalion State Regiment, 1776–77
  • 1st Regiment of Militia, 1778–79
  • 2nd Regiment of Militia, 1776
  • 3rd Regiment of Foot, 1775
  • 3rd Regiment of Militia, 1776
  • 4th Regiment of Militia, 1775–76
  • 5th Regiment of Militia, 1775–76
  • 7th Regiment of Militia, 1775–76
  • 8th Regiment of Militia, 1775–76
  • 8th Regiment of Militia, 1780
  • 9th Regiment of Militia, 1776–81
  • 10th Regiment of Militia, 1776–77
  • 11th Regiment of Militia, 1774
  • 12th Regiment of Militia, 1776
  • 13th Regiment of Militia, 1776
  • 16th Regiment of Militia, 1776
  • 18th Regiment of Militia, 1776
  • 20th Regiment of Militia, 1779–81
  • 21st Regiment of Militia, 1778–81
  • 22nd Regiment of Militia, 1776
  • 25th Regiment of Militia, 1776–78
  • 33rd Regiment of Militia, 1775
  • Belding's Regiment, 1777
  • Bradley's Regiment, 1776–77
  • Burrell's Regiment, 1776–77
  • Canfield's Regiment of Militia, 1781
  • Chapman's Regiment of Militia, 1778
  • Chester's Regiment of Militia, 1776–77
  • Cook's Regiment of Militia, 1777
  • Douglas' Regiment of Levies, 1776
  • Douglas' Regiment, 1776
  • Elmore's Battalion, 1776–77
  • Ely's Regiment, 1777
  • Enos' Regiment, 1776–77
  • Gallup's Regiment, 1779
  • Gay's Regiment, 1776
  • Hooker's Regiment of Militia, 1777
  • Johnson's Regiment of Militia, 1778
  • Latimer's Regiment of Militia, 1777–78
  • Lewis' Regiment, 1776
  • Mason's Regiment of Militia, 1778
  • McClellan's Regiment, 1777–82
  • Mead's Regiment of Militia, 1779
  • Mott's Regiment of Militia, 1776
  • Newberry's Regiment, 1777
  • Parker's Company of Teamsters, 1778
  • Parson's Regiment, 1776
  • Parson's Regiment of Militia, 1777
  • Porter's Regiment, 1781
  • Sage's Regiment, 1776–77
  • Silliman's Regiment, 1776
  • Talcott's Regiment, 1776
  • Thompson's Company
  • Thompson's Regiment, 1777
  • Tyler's Regiment, 1777
  • Ward's Regiment, 1777
  • Waterbury's Regiment, 1776–78
  • Whiting's Regiment, 1777
  • Wells' Regiment of Militia, 1779
  • Wells' Regiment, 1780–81
  • Wolcott's Regiment, 1776