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American Revolutionary War
Continental Regiments

New Hampshire Regiments in the Continental Army

On 25 April 1775, anticipating formal aid from New Hampshire, the New Hampshire Committee of Safety directed Paul Dudley Sargent of Hillsborough County to raise a regiment.

On 18 May the full New Hampshire Provincial Congress resolved to raise men "to join in the common cause of defending our just rights and liberties."

Legislation on 20 May created a Committee of Safety and authorized a 2,000-man quota for the New England army. This figure included those New Hampshire men already in service at Boston.

On 22 May, the Congress adopted a plan. It created three regiments and dispatched two officials to Cambridge to muster the volunteers who had gone to New Hampshire as one of those regiments. The volunteers had already elected John Stark, a veteran of Rogers' Rangers, as their colonel.

On 23 May the Provincial Congress appointed Nathaniel Folsom as the general officer to command the colony's forces, and the Committee of Safety began to nominate officers for the three regiments.

On 24 May Enoch Poor of Exeter received command of the second of the regiments with an order to organize it immediately.

On 1 June the congress appointed the officers of the 3d New Hampshire Regiment, the command going to James Reed of Fitzwilliam. Reed raised it in Strafford and Rockingham counties. Two days later the congress designated the regiment at Boston the 1st, or "eldest," Regiment, and confirmed Stark and its other field officers.

Folsom initially received the rank of brigadier general with duties similar to those of such officers in New Hampshire, except that he had no regimental command.

On 6 June the Provincial Congress reaffirmed his authority as the commanding general, under General Ward, of all New Hampshire forces, and at the end of the month it promoted him to major general. Jealousy by the volunteers at Boston limited his authority for a time.

When Reed assembled his 3d New Hampshire Regiment at Boston on 14 June, he received two of Stark's surplus companies to round out the unit. Poor's 2d New Hampshire Regiment was detained to defend the colony from possible British attack, but it was ordered to Cambridge on 18 June. Its last company arrived in early August.

Although Folsom had wanted an artillery company to support his regiments, New Hampshire had no officers qualified to command one. The best the Provincial Congress could do was to send artillery pieces for the New Hampshire men to use.

The New Hampshire Line was a formation of the Continental Army. It comprised the New Hampshire quota of infantry regiments raised for general service which, together with similar contingents from other states, formed the Continental Line. Commissioned officers of the Continental Army below the rank of brigadier general were ineligible for promotion except in the line of their own state.

There were also infantry regiments and separate companies in the Continental Army that did not belong to the line of any one state. On December 27, 1776, Washington was temporarily given “dictatorial powers,” which included authority to raise sixteen additional Continental Regiments at large. Alexander Scammel of New Hampshire was offered command of one of these regiments in 1777, but he declined in order to become colonel of the newly raised 3d New Hampshire Regiment.

Other regiments and smaller units were raised as needed for some special or temporary service. Bedel's Regiment and Long's Regiment, both raised in 1776, were such “extra” regiments in that they were in excess of the regular New Hampshire quota.

1775

On May 22, 1775, the New Hampshire Provincial Congress voted to raise a volunteer force of 2,000 men to join the patriot army at Boston. These “provincials” were organized into three regiments, each regiment having an official establishment of 648 officers and men in ten companies. The troops were enlisted to serve until December 31, 1775.

The 1st New Hampshire Regiment was commanded by Colonel John Stark, of Derryfield.

The 2d New Hampshire Regiment was commanded by Colonel Enoch Poor, of Exeter.

The 3d New Hampshire Regiment was commanded by Colonel James Reed, of Fitzwilliam.

1776

The three New Hampshire regiments raised in 1775 were used as cadres for the new Continental regiments from New Hampshire, and the same colonels remained in command.

  • The old 1st New Hampshire Regiment became the 5th Continental Regiment, under Colonel John Stark.
  • The old 2d New Hampshire Regiment became the 8th Continental Regiment, under Colonel Enoch Poor.
  • The old 3d New Hampshire Regiment became the 2nd Continental Regiment, under Colonel James Reed.

The low number given to Reed's regiment was meant to resolve a dispute with Colonel Poor from the preceding year over Reed's seniority in the New Hampshire line. Colonel Reed was made a Continental brigadier general on August 9, 1776, and, for the remainder of the year, the 2d Continental Regiment was commanded by its next senior officer, Lieutenant Colonel Nicholas Gilman.

1777-1780

As in January 1776, the three old New Hampshire regiments were used as cadres for three new regiments.

The 5th Continental Regiment became the new 1st New Hampshire Regiment, under Colonel John Stark. Stark resigned from the Continental Army on March 23, 1777. Command of the 1st New Hampshire Regiment passed to its next senior officer, Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Cilley, who was promoted to colonel on April 2, 1777. Stark returned to the Continental Army on October 4, 1777, with the rank of brigadier general.

The 8th Continental Regiment became the new 2d New Hampshire Regiment, under Colonel Enoch Poor. Poor was made a Continental brigadier general on February 21, 1777. Command of the 2d New Hampshire Regiment passed to its next senior officer, Lieutenant Colonel Nathan Hale, who was promoted to colonel on April 2, 1777.

Colonel Hale was captured at the Battle of Hubbardton on July 7, 1777, and died in captivity on September 23, 1780. (He was not related to Nathan Hale of Connecticut, who was hanged as a spy in 1776).

The 2d Continental Regiment became the new 3d New Hampshire Regiment, under Colonel Alexander Scammell. Scammell served as Adjutant General of the Continental Army from January 5, 1778, to January 1, 1781. On the latter date, he assumed command of the 1st New Hampshire Regiment. He was mortally wounded and captured at Yorktown, September 30, 1781, and died in captivity on October 6, 1781.

1781-1784

Under THE 3rd reorganization, the New Hampshire line was reduced from three regiments to two by disbanding the 3d New Hampshire Regiment. Alexander Scammell completed his tour as Adjutant General of the Continental Army and became the commander of the 1st New Hampshire Regiment. The 2nd New Hampshire Regiment was commanded by Lieutenant Colonel George Reid.

The New Hampshire Battalion was merged into the New Hampshire Regiment on June 22, 1783, and the consolidated unit, of five companies, was re-designated the New Hampshire Battalion.

On January 1, 1784, the Continental Line was reduced to a single regiment, under the command of Colonel Henry Jackson. The New Hampshire Battalion was disbanded at New Windsor, New York, and the New Hampshire Line ceased to exist.

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The Pennsylvania Line originated in 1775 was organized into thirteen regiments and several independent companies. Special battalions of line troops were recruited for the Flying Camp from among the Pennsylvania Associators who took part in the New Jersey campaign in 1776.

The term "Pennsylvania Line" referred to the quota of numbered infantry regiments assigned to Pennsylvania at various times by the Continental Congress. For line troops, neither the type of service rendered nor the term of enlistment was uniform.

In certain counties there were recruited special troops called Rangers, who served long enlistments on the frontier against the Indians. Another form of line service was with the Corps of Invalids. Such men of the Pennsylvania Line as became disabled in service but were found capable of light garrison duty were transferred to this special continental regiment. Many of the Invalids were subsequently pensioned.

The financial difficulties of the new government, difficulties that lasted into the 1790's, complicated the payment of troops. Soldiers who served during the years 1777-1780, when the currency was depreciating, were paid in Continental bills of Credit, which quickly lost value. To make amends for such depreciation, each of these men who in 1781 yet remained in line service was awarded a substantial sum in Depreciation Pay Certificates, which were both interest bearing and negotiable, like bonds of the present day.

Somewhat similarly, at the end of the war arrearages and allowances due were met by issuing to each soldier still in the service a number of interest-bearing Final Settlements, also called Pierce's Certificates. To each of her line soldiers, who served to the end of the war, Pennsylvania granted Donation Land in certain western counties, land that remained free from taxation so long as the soldier lived and retained ownership. Contrary to common belief, none of the lands granted to veterans by the federal government were located in Pennsylvania.

1st New Hampshire Regiment

  • The Regiment was authorized on May 22, 1775 in the New Hampshire State Troops as the 1st New Hampshire regiment.
  • Organized on June 3, 1775 at Medford, Massachusetts, to consist of 10 companies from Hillsborough and Rockingham Counties.
  • Adopted on June 14, 1775 and assigned into the Main Continental Army.
    It was assigned on July 22, 1775 to Sullivan's Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army.
  • Reorganized and re-designated on January 1, 1776 as the 5th Continental Regiment, to consist of eight companies.
  • Relieved on April 27, 1776 from Sullivan's Brigade and assigned to the Canadian Department.
  • Relieved on July 2, 1776 from the Canadian Department and assigned to the Northern Department.
    It was assigned on July 20, 1776 to Stark's Brigade, an element of the Northern Department.
  • Relieved on November 26, 1776 from Stark's Brigade and assigned to the Main Continental Army (later to Sullivan's Brigade).
  • Reorganized and re-designated on January 1, 1777 as the 1st New Hampshire Regiment, to consist of eight companies.
  • Relieved on February 14, 1777 from Sullivan's Brigade and assigned to the Northern Department.
    It was assigned on April 28, 1777 to the New Hampshire Brigade, an element of the Northern Department.
  • (New Hampshire Brigade relieved on October 20, 1777 from the Northern Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army)
    Reorganized on December 23, 1778 to consist of nine companies.
  • New Hampshire Brigade relieved on August 19, 1781 from the Main Army and assigned to the Highlands Department
  • Relieved between October 10-14, 1781 from the Highlands Department and assigned to the Northern Department
  • Relieved on November 12, 1782 from the Northern Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • Reorganized and re-designated on March 1, 1783 as the New Hampshire Regiment, to consist of nine companies.
  • Consolidated on June 22, 1783 with the New Hampshire Battalion (see 2nd NH Regt.) and consolidated unit designated as the New Hampshire Battalion to consist of five companies.
  • Disbanded on January 1, 1784 at New Windsor, New York.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

2nd New Hampshire Regiment

  • The Regiment was authorized on May 22, 1775 in the New Hampshire State Troops as the 2d new Hampshire Regiment.
  • Organized between May 24- June 18, 1775 under the command of Colonel Enoch Poor, at Exeter to consist of 10 companies from Strafford and Rockingham Counties.
  • Adopted on June 14, 1775 into the Continental Army and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • Reorganized and redesigned on January 1, 1776 as the 8th Continental Regiment, to consist of 8 Companies.
  • Relieved on April 15, 1776 from Sullivans Brigade and assigned to the Canadian Department.
  • Relieved on July 2 from the Canadian Department and assigned to the Northern Department.
    It was assigned on July 20, 1776 to Reed's Brigade, an element of the Northern Department.
  • Relieved on July 23, 1776 from Reed's Brigade and assigned to Stark's Brigade, an element of the Northern Department.
  • Releved on November 26 from Stark's Brigade and assigned to the Main Continental Army (later to Sullivan's Brigade)
    Reorganized and redesignated on January 1, 1777 as the 2nd New Hampshire Regiment, to consist of 8 companies.
  • Relieved on February 14, 1777 from Sullivan's Brigade and assigned to the Northern Department.
    It was assigned on April 28, 1777 to the New Hampshire Brigade, an element of the Northern Department.
  • July 7, 1777, it was under command of Col. Nathan Hale, who was taken prisoner with the entire regiment at Hubbardton, Vermont.
  • New Hampshire Brigade relieved on October 20, 1777 from the Northern Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • Reorganized on December 23, 1778 to consist of 9 companies.
  • New Hampshire Brigade relieved on August 19, 1781 from the Main Army and assigned to the Highlands Department .
  • New Hampshire Brigade relieved between October 10-14, 1781 from Highlands Department and assigned to the Northern Department.
  • New Hampshire Brigade relieved on November 12, 1782 from Northern Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • Reorganized and redesignated on March 1, 1783 as the New Hampshire Battalion, to consist of 4 companies.
  • Consolidated on June 22, 1783 with the New Hampshire Regiment (see 1st New Hampshire Regiment)

Significant Campaigns and Battles

Unit History

The 2nd New Hampshire Regiment, also known as the 8th Continental Regiment, was formed in early May of 1775, as the second of three Continental Army regiments raised by the state of New Hampshire during the American Revolutionary War. Its first commander was Colonel Enoch Poor, with Joseph Cilley as major. The 2nd NH would see action at the Battle of Trois-Rivières, Battle of Trenton, Battle of Princeton, Battle of Hubbardton, Battle of Saratoga, Battle of Monmouth, the Sullivan Expedition and the Battle of Yorktown. At Hubbardton Col. Hale and part of the regiment were captured by the British Army. During the summer of 1783, the 2nd NH and the 3rd NH were merged into the 1st New Hampshire Regiment and were disbanded on January 1, 1784.

The 2nd New Hampshire's Regimental colours that were captured at Hubbardton and returned to the state of New Hampshire are now housed at the New Hampshire State House in Concord, New Hampshire. It is one of only a few American battle flags from the American Revolution known to still exist.

This idea is under some dispute. The colors containing the motto "The Glory Not the Prey." likely served the New Hampshire Brigade. The other colors captured at the time, the linked 13 rings, were likely divisional colors.

3rd New Hampshire Regiment

  • The Regiment was authorized on May 22, 1775 in the New Hampshire State troops as the 3rd New Hampshire Regiment.
  • Organized between June 1-8, 1775 at Fitzwilliam to consist of 10 companies. From Cheshire, Hillsborough and Cumberland counties.
  • Adopted on June 14, 1775 into the Continental Army and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
    It was assigned on July 22, 1775 to Sullivan's Brigade, an element of the Main Continental Army
    Reorganized and re-designated on January 1, 1776 as the 2nd Continental Regiment, to consist of 8 companies.
  • Relieved on April 27, 1776 from Sullivan's Brigade and assigned to the Canadian Department.
  • Relieved on July 2, 1776 from the Canadian Department and assigned to the Northern Department.
    It was assigned on July 20, 1776 to Stark's Brigade, an element of the Northern Department.
  • Relieved on November 26 from Stark's Brigade and assigned to the Main Continental Army. (Later Sullivan's Brigade)
  • Reorganized and re-designated on January 1, 1777 as the 3rd New Hampshire Regiment, to consist of 8 companies.
  • Relieved on February 14, 1777 from Sullivan's Brigade and assigned to the Northern Department.
    It was assigned on April 28, 1777 to the New Hampshire Brigade, an element of the Northern Department.
  • New Hampshire Brigade relieved on October 20, 1777 from the Northern Department and assigned to the Main Continental Army.
  • Reorganized on December 23, 1778 to consist of 9 companies.
  • Disbanded on January 1, 1781 at Continental Village, New York.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

Unit History

The 3rd New Hampshire Regiment, also known as the 2nd Continental Regiment, was formed on June 1, 1775, as the third of three Continental Army regiments raised by the state of New Hampshire during the American Revolution. Its first commander was Colonel James Reed.

The regiment would see action at the Battle of Bunker Hill, Battle of Trois-Rivières, Battle of Trenton, Battle of Princeton, Battle of Saratoga, Battle of Monmouth, and the Sullivan Expedition. In January 1781, the 3rd NH Regt was merged into the 1st NH Regt.

In 1782, the 1st NH and the 2nd NH became the New Hampshire Regiment and the New Hampshire Battalion. During the summer of 1783, both units were merged into one unit the New Hampshire Battalion and disbanded on January 1, 1784.

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Bedel's Regiment

  • The Regiment was authorized on May 26, 1775 in the New Hampshire State troops as Capt. Timothy Bedel's Company of Rangers.
  • Organized on June 23, 1775 at Coos. Expanded between July 5-6, 1775 as Maj. Timothy Bedel's Corps of Rangers, to consist of 3 companies.
    It was assigned on August 7, 1775 to the New York (later Northern Department).
  • Expanded and reorganized in the Continental Army 8 January-12 March 1776 as Bedel's Regiment, to consist of 8 companies from Northwestern New Hampshire, and assigned to the Canadian Department.
  • Relieved on July 2, 1776 from the Canadian Department and assigned to the Northern Department.
  • Disbanded on January 1, 1777 at Coos

Significant Campaigns and Battles

Unit History

Bedel's Regiment was first raised as a single company of rangers in Coos, New Hampshire on May 26, 1775 under the command of Timothy Bedel for the protection of northern New Hampshire during the early days of the American Revolutionary War.

Between July 1775 and January 1776 eight more companies of rangers were recruited from the frontiersmen of northern New Hampshire as the regiment joined the Continental Army and took part in the Battle of Fort St. Jean and the Battle of Cedars during the Invasion of Canada.

Most of the regiment was captured at Cedars but were exchanged for British soldiers captured during the Canadian campaign eight days later. With the ending of the enlistments of the soldiers the regiment was disbanded on January 1, 1777 at Coos, New Hampshire.

Long's Regiment

  • The Regiment was authorized on May 14, 1776 in the Continental Army as a regiment to be organized in New Hampshire and assigned to the Eastern Department.
  • Organized between August 16-25 September 1776 at Newcastle as Long's Regiment, to consist of 8 companies from eastern New Hampshire.
  • Relieved on November 22, 1776 from the Eastern Department and assigned to the Northern Department.
  • Disbanded in July 1777 in northern New York.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

Unit History

Long's Regiment was raised on May 14, 1776 at New Castle, New Hampshire under Colonel Pierse Long for service with the Continental Army. The regiment was stationed at Fort Ticonderoga and Mount Independence on Lake Champlain and fought a delaying action at Fort Ann, New York on July 8, 1777 against the advance units of John Burgoyne's army.

The regiment was disbanded at the end of July, 1777 in northern New York as the one year enlistments of the men ran out before the main engagements of the Saratoga Campaign.

Col. Long and some of the men of the regiment joined other New Hampshire regiments that fought at Saratoga.

Whitcomb's Rangers

The Regiment was authorized on October 15, 1776 in the Continental Army as Whitcomb's Rangers, an element of the Northern Department. Congress adopted the following resolution: "In Congress Assembled - Resolved, That two independent Companies consisting of fifty Men each, be immediately raised to be commanded by Lieutenant Whitcomb, who should be appointed Captain Commandant - that he nominate the Officers of the said two Companies who are to be appointed, when approved by the commanding Officer of the Northern Department."

Organized in November 1776 at Fort Ticonderoga, New York, to consist of 2 companies from northwestern New Hampshire.

Spring of 1777, Benjamin Whitcomb's Independent Corps of Rangers began fulfilling their role in earnest by the. The Rangers quickly built a reputation for their skill at scouting and raiding, primarily in small groups of from two to twenty men.

Whitcomb's Rangers were with the American Army as it was forced by the British to abandon Fort Ticonderoga and Mount Independence on July 6, 1777. They marched from Mt. Independence over 20 miles away to Hubbardton, and there fought a successful but costly rear guard action the next day on July 7. While considered a British victory, the Battle of Hubbardton had served its purpose for the Americans by giving the majority of the Army time to escape and regroup.

On August 16, Whitcomb's men were part of an American force that fought a successful engagement at the Battle of Bennington.

Some of Whitcomb's men were with Colonel Brown when he made a gallant attempt to retake Fort Ticonderoga on September 17-22, 1777. The attempt failed owing to the sturdy defenses, but it did succeed in destroying the shipping and outer works of the fort, and in capturing 225 British and Germans and releasing 100 American prisoners. At the same time, the main force of the American Army was making its way north of Albany where Whitcomb himself was reportedly the first person to have observed the approaching British army along Bemis Heights. When Burgoyne came up against the American positions at Freeman's Farm on September 19, some of Whitcomb's Rangers served with Dearborne's Light Infantry Battalion and fought the first battle of Saratoga. After the battle, they were assigned to watch Burgoyne's left flank until General Stark could move into position to cut off the British retreat.

Whitcomb was promoted to Major in November of 1777, and the Rangers were eventually assigned to Rutland, Vermont. Whitcomb being the senior Continental Army officer in the area, served as overall commander of Fort Ranger, and commanded several militia companies, another company of Continental Rangers, and a portion of Seth Warner's Regiment, the only other Continental troops in Vermont.

Disbanded 1 January 1781 at Coos, New Hampshire as part of an army-wide reorganization, orders came from Congress for Whitcomb to send his non-commissioned officers and privates to join the Continental Army and for the officers to retire. An appeal was made to General Washington but the original orders stood. Most of the rangers became part of the New Hampshire Continental Line.

Significant Campaigns and Battles

Unit History

Benjamin Whitcomb enlisted as a Lieutenant in a regiment of Col. ?? Bedel' s New Hampshire Rangers on January 22, 1776. Whitcomb's company served as a rear guard for the American Army in the Northern Department as the army moved south from Canada after the failed Canadian Campaign.

Because of Whitcomb's extensive experience in the area of the Champlain Valley from his service in the French & Indian Wars, American commanders frequently used him as a scout around Fort Ticonderoga and surrounding areas. On one such mission, Whitcomb shot and fatally wounded the commander of the British First Brigade, Brig. Gen. Patrick Gordon. As a result of this, the British put a price on Whitcomb's head, and he and his men were vigorously hunted by British and their Indian allies for the remainder of the war.

On September 30, 1776, because of Whitcomb's prowess as a ranger and scout, Maj. Gen. Horatio Gates recommended to Congress that he be given command of his own corps of rangers. Gates address to John Hancock, President of the Congress stated in part: " ...I must now beg leave to recommend Lieut. Whitcomb as a very proper person, to have the Command of Two Independent Companies, of Fifty Men each to be recruited by Himself, and the Officers to be Commissioned agreeable to his Recommendations. I never knew any Man more capable of doing good Service, in the Ranging or Scouting way, than Lieut. Whitcomb, and his Sobriety, Honor, and Truth illustrate his Military Talents."

They traveled great distances from their posts at or around Mount Independence and Fort Ticonderoga on the open water by canoe, and over land by foot. Scouting parities of Whitcomb's men frequently traveled from their posts to over 100 miles north through savage infested wilderness into enemy territory to gather information from the area around Montreal.

Misc Militia Units

  • Baker's Company of Volunteer, 1777
  • Baldwin's Regiment, 1776
  • Bartlett's Regiment of Militia, 1780
  • Bedel's Militia Regiment, 1777–79
  • Bell's Regiment of Militia, 1781
  • Bellow's Regiment of Militia, 1776–77
  • Chase's Regiment of Militia, 1776–77
  • Dame's Regiment, 1779–80
  • Drake's Regiment of Militia, 1777
  • Evans' Regiment of Militia, 1777
  • Fogg's Regiment, 1776–77
  • Gale's Regiment of Volunteers, 1778
  • Gerrish's Regiment, 1777
  • Gilman's Regiment of Militia, 1776–77
  • Hale's Regiment of Militia, 1776–78
  • Hobart's Regiment of Militia, 1777
  • Kelley's Regiment of Volunteers, 1777–78
  • Langdon's Company of Light Horse Volunteers, 1777–78
  • Lovewell's Regiment, 1778–81

  • McClary's Regiment of Militia, 1777–81
  • Mooney's Regiment of Militia, 1779–80
  • Moore's Regiment of Militia, 1777
  • Morey's Regiment of Militia, 1777
  • Moulton's Regiment of Militia, 1775–83
  • Nichols' Regiment of Militia, 1777–80
  • Peabody's New Hampshire State Regiment, 1778–79
  • Poor's Regiment, 1775
  • Reed's Regiment, 1775
  • Reynold's Regiment of Militia, 1781
  • Scott's Battalion, 1783
  • Senter's Regiment, 1777–78
  • Stark's Regiment, 1775
  • Stickney's Regiment of Militia, 1777
  • Tash's Regiment, 1776
  • Waldron's Regiment, 1776
  • Webster's Regiment, 1777–82
  • Welch's Regiment of Militia, 1777
  • Wingate's Regiment, 1776–78
  • Wyman's Regiment, 1776

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Links to New Hampshire Units in the Revolutionary War

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